Frank C. Perry, DDS

Do You Keep Waking Up Headaches?

Keep Waking Up With Headaches?

If the first thing you feel in the morning is a headache or pain behind your eyes or pain in your neck and shoulders, come in for a visit. What you’re experiencing could be the result of problems in your mouth. These are common symptoms of a condition known as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ), which basically means that your jaws don’t align properly. This misalignment stresses the jaw joints, putting pressure on nerves and muscles – which can result in morning headaches, migraines or facial and neck pain.

Not everyone with TMJ disorder shows symptoms. And not everyone has headaches or pain; TMJ disorder can also lead to broken teeth or fillings, loose teeth and toothaches. What is certain is that if you do display any of these symptoms, they won’t get better without professional help.

Many people find that resting the jaw helps ease the pain. You can do this by eating soft foods, avoiding chewing gum and hard candies. We can also show you jaw exercises to stretch the jaw joints and relieve stress. For most people, the most effective treatment is a custom dental splint that fits over your upper and lower teeth. This reduces the damage done from repeated clenching of the jaw or teeth grinding.

If these conservative methods don’t work, you still have other options. The temporomandibular joints can be treated easily in most cases and the pain will subside and you will be happy again.  Come in for a visit and we’ll help you find the right solution.

call 631-654-0707 schedule an appointment with Dr. Perry as soon as possible.  Please do not suffer any more!

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What is the Best Age for Braces?

One question that many people, especially parents, face is at what is the best age for braces? Get them too early and further treatment might be required later in life; get them too late and they may need to be worn for a longer period (of time) or cause additional problems for the already angst-ridden teenage years.
There’s no universal right answer to this question, but I can draw from my years of experience to provide some advice on factors to consider when deciding the best age for braces.

Early Intervention: Ages 7-9

I recommend having a child evaluated for braces as early as age 7. This does not mean that braces will be applied that early, but it can give you a roadmap of what future treatment might look like.
By age 7, most baby teeth have started to come out and an orthodontist or dentist can get a good sense of what the alignment of permanent teeth will look like. In some cases, braces or partial teeth aligners may be applied at this stage if a child is having difficulty talking or eating due to poor teeth alignment.
A child is also a candidate for early braces if he or she has protruding teeth, a crossbite, or tooth crowding. Catching and treating these symptoms early can prevent them from becoming worse as more permanent teeth arrive.
If your child needs braces at an early age, be prepared to help him or her take care of them. Wearing braces can provide a valuable lesson in self-care, but may require additional intervention until good habits are formed.

Prime Treatment Time: Ages 10-14

Most children who receive braces begin treatment between the ages of 10 and 14. At this age, baby teeth have completely fallen out and the jaw is stable enough to support long-term orthodontic treatment.
Braces come in several varieties from traditional metal brackets to ceramics and invisible aligners. What used to be a stigma about wearing braces has largely been eliminated due to the prevalence of braces among adolescents, but it is important to talk with your child about the changes to his or her appearance that will come as a result of wearing braces.
Unlike young children, teens and pre-teens should be mature and responsible enough to manage braces on their own with little parental intervention. The average time for wearing braces at this age is one and a half to two years.
Once braces come off, a retainer will likely be needed to keep teeth in their correct alignment and prevent additional treatment later on.

Older Options: Ages 14+

Contrary to what you might think, you are never too old for braces! Many adults do not have access to orthodontics as kids or delay getting braces for other reasons.
Think of teeth the way you would any other bone on your body. They do stop growing at the end of adolescence, but it’s still possible to correct them throughout your life. If your arm breaks, it can heal and be put back into place with a cast. Teeth are no different.
As an adult, you likely already have an established routine that we will need to modify to account for braces. You may need to alter your diet, your morning and evening schedules, or even some of the activities you do.
No matter what changes you need to make, keep in mind that they are short-term sacrifices for long-term gains in confidence and dental health. Wearing braces for a few years can save you from more serious dental issues down the road.

Ask Dr Perry for an orthodontic evaluation at your next appointment. Please call 631-654-0707

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Inlays and Onlays Get Rid Of the Mercury

AFTER REMOVAL OF AMALGAM

BEFORE REMOVAL OF AMALGAM

 

 

 

 

 

When more than half of the tooth’s biting surface is damaged a dentist will often use an inlay or onlay. Inlays and onlays can be made of porcelain, gold, or composite resin. These pieces are bonded to the damaged area of the tooth. An inlay, which is similar to a filling, is used inside the cusp tips of the tooth. An onlay is a more substantial reconstruction, similar to the inlay but extending out over one or more of the cusps of the tooth. Traditionally, gold has been the material of choice for inlays and onlays. In recent years, however, porcelain has become increasingly popular due to its strength and color, which can potentially match the natural color of your teeth. Inlays and onlays require two appointments to complete the procedure. During the first visit, the filling being replaced or the damaged or decaying area of the tooth is removed, and the tooth is prepared for the inlay or onlay. To ensure proper fit and bite, an impression of the tooth is made by the dentist, and sent to a lab for fabrication. The dentist will then apply a temporary sealant on the tooth and schedule the next appointment. At the second appointment, the temporary sealant is removed. Dr. Perry will then make sure that the inlay or onlay fits correctly. If the fit is satisfactory, the inlay or onlay will be bonded to the tooth with a strong resin and polished to a smooth finish.

Traditional fillings can reduce the strength of a natural tooth by up to 50 percent. As an alternative, inlays and onlays, which are bonded directly onto the tooth using special high-strength resins, can actually increase the strength of a tooth by up to 75 percent. As a result, they can last from 10 to 30 years. In some cases, where the damage to the tooth is not extensive enough to merit an entire crown, onlays can provide a very good alternative.

Do I Suffer From Sleep Apnea??

About 80 million people in North America snore, and approximately 12 million Americans have sleep apnea. So what’s the difference, and why does it matter?

Snoring is caused by the vibration of the soft palate and uvula, occurring when the airway becomes obstructed during sleep. Several things can obstruct the airway and cause you to snore, including allergies, drinking before bed, being overweight and having large tonsils or a deviated septum.

If you snore now and then, you probably have nothing to worry about. But chronic snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea, a more serious sleep disorder. People with sleep apnea stop breathing in their sleep – sometimes up to 100 hundred times an hour – for one minute or longer. Left untreated, sleep apnea can increase your chances of serious health conditions like high blood pressure and heart disease. At a minimum, you may feel groggy in the morning or unable to concentrate during the day.

The good news is sleep apnea is treatable. The two most common ways to treat sleep apnea are continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, which is administered by a physician, and oral appliance therapy, which is administered by a dentist. CPAP therapy can be very effective for people with sleep apnea, but some find it difficult to sleep with a mask. More people are increasingly turning to the oral appliances administered by dentists. Oral appliances are small, flexible devices that look like mouthguards. They increase the airway space and reduce air velocity and soft tissue vibration (snoring) by moving the lower jaw into a forward position. Patients who have tried both say that oral appliances are more comfortable to wear, easier to care for and very cost-effective.

We can make you an appliance in a few days to wear in your mouth to prevent sleep apnea

see the photo below

Which Do YOU Want to Go To Bed With

Bad Breath, Bad News

Bad breath is bad news. Don’t let bad breath be a part of your day! In our office, we are asked on an almost daily basis “How can I get rid of my bad breath?”

Here are some quick and easy tips to help keep your breath fresh and clean:

1. Brush and Floss Regularly:
It’s basic advice, but foolproof. Brushing at least twice a day and flossing and tongue scraping once is the best way to combat bad breath. When the bacteria in your mouth have bits of food and debris to feed on, they create the odors that cause bad breath. Keeping your mouth clean will keep your breath clean at the same time!

2. Drink Water:
You don’t always have access to a toothbrush. As it turns out though, water can be an effective way to freshen your breath until you can get home and brush. Water helps clean out your mouth and prevents dryness, another major cause of bad breath.

3. Eat Good Foods:
A good way to prevent bad breath is to stay away from foods that make your breath smell bad, and eat foods those that will help your breath smell good! Melons and citrus fruit are high in Vitamin C, and help kill bacteria in your mouth. Fibrous foods like apples and celery can help remove food stuck in your teeth, reducing smells caused by bacteria feeding on them.

4. Choose gum and mints with Xylitol:
Sugary gum and breath mints are often used to tackle bad breath. However, the stinky bacteria in your mouth love sugar, and giving them more tends to produce acid that can make your breath smell worse AND lead to tooth decay. Xylitol is a sugar alternative that bacteria cannot break down, which makes it a perfect method for keeping your breath fresh and clean.

If you are troubled by your bad breath, ask us for more tips on staying fresh and clean!

Missing Teeth: More than Just a Gap In Your Smile

While it is true that the most obvious effect of missing teeth is a gap in your smile, missing teeth can cause other problems that you might not be immediately aware of. For example, did you know that for every missing tooth you have you lose 10 percent of your chewing ability? Read on to get a better idea of how a missing tooth can affect your life.

Surrounding Teeth
A missing tooth usually means more stress for the remaining teeth. In addition to that, if you are missing a tooth on the lower jaw, the opposing tooth on the top can grow longer to fill the gap in a process known as superuption or extrusion. This could lead to teeth tilting and move out of place by drifting into the space that was left by your missing tooth – a disaster for your beautiful smile!

Digestive Health
If you are missing teeth, you can’t enjoy all of the foods that you are used to eating – bad for your health and bad for your mood! Say goodbye to caramel apples, saltwater taffy, crunchy carrots and even gum. And because the variety in your diet is reduced when a tooth is missing, digestive problems are unfortunate yet common.

Decay and Hygiene Problems
The shifting of your teeth may cause new hygiene issues as it may be difficult to brush and floss like you normally would. This leaves your mouth more vulnerable to gum disease and tooth decay.

Facial Aesthetics
People with more than one missing tooth may also have issues with a collapsed bite which causes a loss of vertical dimension. This could make your face appear shorter, as the distance between the tip of your nose and your chin would decrease.

The good news is that you don’t have to suffer anymore! Dental implants can help you avoid all of the problems listed above and let you live your life normally again. It’s never too late for a dental implant, give us a call at Frank C Perry DDS PC Phone Number 631-654-0707 to find out about this life-changing procedure.

Rene Laennec’s 235th Birthday

February 17, 2016
Rene Laennec’s 235th Birthday- invented the very first stethoscope!
Late in 1816, while examining a patient suffering complications of the heart, René Laennec’s memory of a stroll taken months prior came rushing back. Walking the courtyard of the Louvre that day, he observed two children playing with a long stick–one scraped it with a pin while the other listened giddily to the amplified sound on the other end.
Recalling this, Laennec rolled up a piece of paper and pressed it to his patient’s chest. The beating of her heart was suddenly audible and clear, and the stethoscope–an innovation that would fundamentally change the detection and diagnosis of lung and heart problems–was born.
After several prototypes, he settled on an instrument that resembled a long, wooden tube. Using his invention, Laennec continued his research on sound in diagnostic medicine and made several important contributions to the field. To celebrate what would have been his 235th birthday, artists Helene Leroux and Olivia Huynh depicted Laennec’s very first stethoscope beside the one we know today.
Happy birthday, Dr. Laennec.

Yes. You still have to floss.

The AP recently released an article making the claim that “there’s little proof that flossing works”. Their review cited a series of studies that found flossing does little or nothing to improve oral health.

Here’s the problem: the studies were flawed.

The AP concluded that floss does little for oral health, but it’s important to note that the evidence they cited was very weak at best. In fact, they said so themselves.

As acknowledged by the AP, many of these studies were extremely short. “Some lasted only two weeks, far too brief for a cavity or dental disease to develop” (Associated Press). They also say that “One tested 25 people after only a single use of floss” (Associated Press).

Of course the evidence is unreliable. You don’t simply develop gum disease because you forgot to floss yesterday. Cavities and gum disease do not happen overnight. You can prevent gum disease by maintaining a clean mouth over a long period of time. Wayne Aldredge, President of the American Academy of Periodontology explained: “gum disease is a very slow disease”. In his interview with the AP he recommended long-term studies which he believes would clearly show the difference between people who floss and people who don’t.

Lets put it this way: If a study claims drinking milk does nothing for bone health, but draws conclusions after only three glasses of milk, is it a reliable study? What do you think?

The fact of the matter is floss removes gunk from teeth. You can see it. Gunk feeds bacteria which leads to plaque, cavities, poor gum health, and eventually gum disease. Floss has the ability to reach the food particles that your brush can’t get to.

Aldredge also pointed out that most people floss incorrectly, using a sawing motion instead of moving up and around the teeth to clean the cracks. Positive results come from correct use and it’s critical that people learn to use a tool properly before discarding it as useless.

That’s just what floss is: a tool. Just like your toothbrush, it is designed to keep your mouth clean, and therefore keep your body safe from infection. Both your toothbrush and floss are designed to do what the other can’t, and both successfully remove bacteria from your mouth. Just like proper brushing technique, it is important that you know how to use floss properly, so that you can reap the long-term health benefits of good oral hygiene.

It’s a shame that studies on an important tool such as floss have yielded poor results, but it’s a bigger shame that the studies themselves were poorly designed. Oral hygiene is a long term process, and requires long term observations to make worthwhile conclusions. In the mean time, it’s obvious that you should continue to do everything you can to protect your well being, and floss is one of many tools that can help you do that. If you would like a refresher on the best, most efficient techniques for floss use feel free to call our office today at 631-654-0707!

Taking Care of Your Veneers

Congratulations! You’ve just received your brand new veneers. Your smile has never looked this good, and you probably want to make sure it stays that way! Good veneers can last a long, long time, but only if you take good care of them along the way.

Here are some tips to make your veneers last a decade and even more:

Treat Them Like Teeth
You can ensure that your veneers last a long time if you brush them with the same care that you would your original teeth. Brush twice and floss once daily for best results!

Regular Cleanings
It’s important that we continue to schedule appointments with you so that we can make sure your veneers are looking their best, and that they stay that way. The week after the veneers are placed is the most important visit, followed by your regular dental hygiene visits, during which we can keep an eye out for potential problems.

Try Not to Grind
Many people grind their teeth, but it’s important that you let us know if you have a history of doing so. Measures can be taken to avoid damage to your new veneers over time, such as a nighttime mouth guard to protect your new smile.

Avoid Damage
Biting down on hard food is dangerous for any teeth, and even more so for veneers. Avoid using your veneers to bite down on hard materials and foods. The less stress you put on them the better.

Staining
Veneers keep their shade beautifully over the years, but they are not immune from staining. Avoid the same foods and beverages that you do for your natural teeth such as coffee, tea, wine (and smoking)!

What is involved in the procedure?
First we evaluate your teeth using various kinds of imaging and impressions to ensure that veneers are a good choice for you. Next we create a mock-up so that you can see what your teeth will look like after the procedure, before you make your final decision. If you decide to proceed the first step is to remove a thin layer of enamel from the teeth and then make an impression from which we can build the veneers. The veneers are bonded to the teeth with dental cement and hardened using a special light. That’s where the procedure ends and your new smile begins.

If you are ready for a smile upgrade with veneers, give us a call at Frank C Perry DDS PC Phone Number 631-654-0707!

Take Care of Your Veneers!

Congratulations on your new veneers! You’ve got your smile exactly the way you want it!

takecareveneersIt’s not just for Christmas – it’s for a lifetime! What should you do to keep those pearly whites nice and tidy?

Keep them clean
Your veneers require the same kind of care your natural teeth do. Brush twice and floss once a day for at least two minutes, and drink plenty of water in between. Pick a non-abrasive toothpaste that contains fluoride, and choose a soft-bristled toothbrush to make sure you don’t harm the porcelain.

Stay Away from Stains
Your natural teeth still are vulnerable to staining. So, to keep your natural teeth matching your veneers for an all-over bright smile, you will want to avoid the following stain-culprits as much as possible. Several types of food and drink can cause your natural teeth to stain, such as red wine, coffee, black tea, curry, berries, and tomato sauce. You don’t have to cut these out completely, just remain stain free by practicing moderation!

Watch That Bite
Avoid biting into hard foods such as nuts and ice cubes, as this could cause your veneers to crack or chip.

Buddy-Up with Your Dentist
A visit to the dentist should be as important as remembering your best friend’s birthday, so mark it down in your calendar!

Regular visits to Frank C Perry DDS PC as well as at-home care can keep your porcelain veneers looking shiny and new for a very long time! Call us today to book your appointment! 631-654-0707

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